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071.Sean Hovendick

Sean Hovendick

graduated from Eastern New Mexico University studying broadcast communication, art and computer animation. After ten years of industry experience in motion graphics, video post-production and multimedia, Sean went on to earn his MFA in computer art from the Department of Transmedia at Syracuse University.

Detailed biography

WORK 1
netart by Sean Hovendick (USA)

“Reality_Bytes”
Year of production: 2005
Used technology (software etc): Photoshop, Flash
Required plug-ins: Flash Player

Enter the work here

Through the constant bombardment of media images, the public is offered a version of reality that is simply fabricated not to benefit the citizens, but the agendas and egos of the political officials themselves. We cannot escape this manipulated form of governmental marketing.
Just as images surface in the media during times of the leader’s “hard sell” of issues, the animations of “Reality_Bytes” pulsate and breathe – a throbbing reminder of the messages we can’t determine as being true or false.
“Reality_Bytes” reverses the control political leaders have on our society so to temporarily alter the “reality” presented to us; the only power we have to control the one-sided bias of media communication.

Work 2
netart by Sean Hovendick (USA)

Title: “Be A Man”
Year of production: 2007-2010
Used technology (software etc): Photoshop, Flash
Required plug-ins: Flash Player

Enter the work here

Learned behaviors have many sources: parents, siblings, friends, neighbors… however, when those elements are unavailable, or at best weak in their ability to contribute to the learning process, the influence that is always available is television.
Television grows more powerful every day, as our filters of critique remain oblivious to its control allowing mediated behaviors to permeate our senses. The mental anguish, confusion, and isolation brought about by its endless consumption, feeds on itself with no sign of repentance.
“Be A Man” along with the female counterpart “Sugar and Spice” represents the mediated psyche constantly in flux and endlessly referencing gender-role behaviors learned through the media. The dual, touch-screen monitors allow the audience to explore and relate to gender roles portrayed in television sitcoms from the 70’s and 80’s presented as looping audio/video clips.
Is it possible to disregard mediated reality? Can we be sure of our true personalities? Or will the power of television forever be the driving force of cultural control?

Work 3
netart by Sean Hovendick (USA)

Title: “Sugar And Spice”
Year of production: 2007-2010
Used technology (software etc): Photoshop, Flash
Required plug-ins: Flash Player

Enter the work here

Learned behaviors have many sources: parents, siblings, friends, neighbors… however, when those elements are unavailable, or at best weak in their ability to contribute to the learning process, the influence that is always available is television.
Television grows more powerful every day, as our filters of critique remain oblivious to its control allowing mediated behaviors to permeate our senses. The mental anguish, confusion, and isolation brought about by its endless consumption, feeds on itself with no sign of repentance.
“Sugar and Spice” along with the male counterpart “Be A Man” represents the mediated psyche constantly in flux and endlessly referencing gender-role behaviors learned through the media. The dual, touch-screen monitors allow the audience to explore and relate to gender roles portrayed in television sitcoms from the 70’s and 80’s presented as looping audio/video clips.
Is it possible to disregard mediated reality? Can we be sure of our true personalities? Or will the power of television forever be the driving force of cultural control?